PA, Projects

Acquisition: “Vicky Romeo plus Joolz” by Ely Percy

Dear Creatures,

The start of June, Pride Month 2018, brings you good tidings!

We’re very pleased to announce that in February 2019 we will be publishing Ely Percy’s debut novel “Vicky Romeo plus Joolz”.

Welcome into the fold Ely! We are excited to work on this novel with you and to share it with the world.

A little more about the story:

Enter Vicky Romeo: lover, actor, dreamer, bull-shitter and procrastinator. Vicky is a barista by day, and an after-hours Lothario who haunts Glasgow’s lesbian scene by night. She fantasises about being a performer like her heroes Sinatra and De Niro, but wastes time boozing with her friends and chasing skirt with her ever-faithful sidekick, Minty, a dry-humoured and often surly barmaid who pulls pints in Sandra Dee’s.

Enter Julie Turner AKA Joolz AKA Juliet: sexy, sassy, sarcastic, and a dancer with Jessica Rabbit looks to boot.

Sparks fly for Vicky when she picks the feisty femme’s lipstick off the bar floor, and despite warnings from Minty that Joolz is ‘not a real lesbian’, Vicky decides to pursue her love interest with unrelenting gusto.

Set in 2001, Vicky Romeo plus Joolz is a romp through Glasgow’s gay ghetto, narrated from the point of view of a young, working-class and incurably romantic butch-about-town.

Ely snapshot

You can read a short extract of the novel in Fearless Femme’s June “Pride” issue.


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Ely Percy is a Scottish fiction writer, a memoirist and an epistolarian.

Their first work Cracked: Recovering From Traumatic Brain Injury (JKP, 2002) took the form of both a creative and an academic text; they graduated with distinction from Glasgow University’s Mphil in Creative Writing in 2004, and since then their work has appeared in many reputable literary journals such as The Edinburgh Review, The Scotsman Orange, New Writing Scotland and Causeway. Ely has also contributed to both volumes of F, M or Other: Quarrels with the Gender Binary.

Over the last fifteen years, Percy has facilitated countless writing workshops for various minority groups. They’ve been writer-in-residence in a prison, edited a lesbian publication and worked as a community librarian in an LGBT centre. They are currently writer-in-residence at Cradle vegan cafe.

You can follow Ely on Twitter and their blog.

Contributors, Interviews, Projects

Meet the Humans: Jonathan Bay

UPDATE: This week we have climbed over the £2000 threshold! Let’s keep it going folks. 

As part of our campaign we will be introducing you to our contributors – the fabulous, creative and talented people we’ve recruited for this project.


Jonathan Bay is a trans poet from California currently living in Scotland as he finishes up a PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Edinburgh. He is a House of Three poet and has been published in many journals and anthologies in UK. He likes intriguingly flavourful beer, traveling to wild places and empty quiet rooms.IMG_0133

[Knight Errant Press]: Is gender identity a theme that comes up a lot in your writing? If not, what pushed you to explore it this time around?

[Jonathan]: Gender identity is not necessarily something that I try to focus on exploring through my poetry – I find that it crops in though. I am most interested in exploring my own trans experience and how it relates to the world. I am highly conscious of my own upbringing as a then female bodied white middle class person and how that has affected the way in which I interact within the world. I don’t want to erase that past.

[KEP]: Has exploring gender affected your worldview and your writing and reading habits?

[J]: I’ve been lucky to get to explore queer writing in my postgraduate studies.

[KEP]: Was there a particular book, short story, poem or event in your life that inspired you to write your own?

[J]: At twelve I was encouraged to write poetry to process my parents’ divorce. I have been writing ever since.

[KEP]: What author or book do you think is most underrated? And why? 

[J]: I don’t think it’s underrated, but I love Li-Young Lee’s The City in Which I Love You.

[KEP]: Tea or coffee?

[J]: Depends on my mood.

[KEP]: Early morning or late into the night?

[J]: I enjoy sleeping, but there is something about the quiet of early morning and the way that it makes you feel like you have so much more time that I love.

[KEP]: Digital or analogue?

[J]: I prefer analogue but I am not a luddite.

 


GetFileAttachmentWould you like to support #QueerQuarrels?

Here are a few ways you can do so:

  1. pre-order the book (and other perks) on Kickstarter
  2. boost us on Thunderclap
  3. support us by sharing and retweeting on Facebook and Twitter!
  4. if you’re in Edinburgh, Scotland – pick up a copy of our preview booklet @LighthouseBooks
Contributors, Interviews, Projects

Meet the Humans: Ever Dundas

UPDATE: We reached 25% ! Go you! Go us! Keep it up folks, share with your friends, family and comrades. 

As part of our campaign we will be introducing you to our contributors – the fabulous, creative and talented people we’ve recruited for this project.


I’m a writer specialising in the weird and macabre, with Queer Theory (problematizing the ‘normal’) forming the backbone of my work. I write literary fiction, sci-fi, horror, and faVenice 2013ntasy. My first novel, Goblin, won the Saltire First Book of the Year Award 2017. I’m currently working on my second novel, HellSans, a science fiction thriller with disability as a major theme.

WebsiteTwitterFacebook

[Knight Errant Press] Is gender identity a theme that comes up a lot in your writing? If not, what pushed you to explore it this time around?

[Ever]: Yes. Growing up, I was keenly aware of how oppressive gender could be. Because the backbone of all my writing is ‘queering the normal’ and defamiliarisation, tackling the way gender constrains our lives comes up a lot in my writing.

[KEP] Has exploring gender affected your worldview and your writing and reading habits?

[E]: In terms of worldview, it makes me sad and disappointed that we allow gender to constrain our lives – there’s so much lost potential, and so many lost lives. As a writer, I see how much it constrains creativity – writers peddling the same boring gender norms just make me roll my eyes with boredom. We can do better.

[KEP] Was there a particular book, short story, poem or event in your life that inspired you to write your own?

[E]: It’s hard to narrow it down to one – pretty much every book I’ve read has been inspiring. I’ve wanted to write a novel since I was seven and the main books that cemented that ambition as a kid are Groosham Grange by Anthony Horowitz, Run For Your Life by David Line, The Great Ghost Rescue by Eva Ibbotson, and A Box of Nothing by Peter Dickinson. Films like The Princess Bride, Labyrinth and Time Bandits also inspired child-me.

[KEP] What author or book do you think is most underrated? And why? (Prime time for some reading recommendations.)

[E]: Everything by comic writer and artist Charles Burns. I love his bizarre depiction of our world, and his incisive commentary on the rot beneath the suburban veneer. He also deals well with the way children try to make sense of an often baffling adult world, and he captures the fraught tensions of teendom (particularly in Black Hole). I adore his artwork – he’s renowned for heavily stylised large swathes of black ink against crisp white, but he also uses colour to great (and nauseating) effect in the Last Look trilogy. If you want delicious art, existential angst, and lashing of strangeness and body horror, Burns is your creature.

[KEP] Is there any book, written by someone else, that you wish you’d written? Would you change it, if yes – how?

[E]: The Vegetarian by Han Kang and Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer. I wouldn’t change anything – they’re both perfect.

[KEP] What’s the most famous book you haven’t read?/play you haven’t seen?/album you haven’t listened to?/film and TV series you haven’t watched?

[E]: Jane Austen’s books.

Not the most famous, but I wish I’d seen one of the professional productions of Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

I’ve purposively avoided all albums by Oasis and Blur.

I haven’t seen LaLaLand because I’m convinced it will irritate me. I might be proved wrong…

I’ve still to watch The Handmaid’s Tale.

[KEP] Do you ever feel like you have book FOMO (fear of missing out) because of a famous title you haven’t had the chance to read, if so, which one?

[E]: Up until a couple of years ago it was 2001 by Arthur C Clarke. Now it’s everything by Joan Didion.

[KEP] Tea or coffee?

[E]: Damn fine coffee.

[KEP] Early morning or late into the night?

[E]: The gloaming.

[KEP] Digital or analogue?

[E]: Both.

 


Would you like to support #QueerQuarrels?

GetFileAttachment

Here are a couple of the ways you can do so:

  1. pre-order the book (and other perks) on Kickstarter
  2. boost us on Thunderclap
  3. support us by sharing and retweeting on Facebook and Twitter!
  4. if you’re in Edinburgh, Scotland – pick up a copy of our preview booklet @LighthouseBooks